Username: Password:

Author Topic: Strat copy intonation problems  (Read 3791 times)

Offline Mick

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 678
  • Site Owner
    • guitarist-guild
    • View Profile
    • Guitarist Guild
Strat copy intonation problems
« on: February 02, 2014, 01:46:58 PM »
Tried to intonate my cheapy Stratocaster  copy the other day, but couldn't do it without lowering the action quite a bit.  I ran out of travel on a couple of the bridge saddles, so had to lower them quite a bit to get it right.  Being a really cheap guitar I'd expect some problems like this tbh, the action was pretty high out of the box.

Does anyone know if this is different depending on what type and make of strings are used?  Will I have to go through this procedure again id I swap string brand / gauge etc?


Thank You, "Guest" For Reading This Post.

Camera Craniums

Guitarist Guild

Offline Scarebear

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 338
  • Terrible guitar player and proud of it.
    • scarysounds
    • View Profile
    • scarebear.org
Re: Strat copy intonation problems
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2014, 03:48:31 AM »
If your cheap guitar is anything like a couple of my cheap copies, your neck could also require adjustment. That could give you some play back in the saddle.
scarebear.rocks - terrible guitar playing verbalised as terrible writing.

Offline Hinfrance

  • Global Moderator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 257
    • View Profile
Re: Strat copy intonation problems
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2014, 12:58:30 PM »
Can I ask why you are adjusting the action height when you are trying to sort out the intonation?

Before you adjust the intonation you should:
1) set the action to a suitable height.
2) adjust the truss rod to provide at least a business card's clearance beneath the high E string at the frets between 11 and 13, with the string fretted at the top fret usually 22 on a Strat.
3) tune the guitar. With the tuner still plugged in make sure that when you fret each string at the 12th fret the pitch of the string does not change (this is easiest done by playing an octave harmonic and then fretting the string). The intonation is adjusted by moving the bridge saddle towards the neck if the fretted note is too low, or towards the tail piece if too high, and NOT by adjusting the bridge height.

That said, a friend of mine has a cheap Strat that will not intonate properly no matter what.

Try these helpful vids:

list=PLA32AD51107427A4B&feature=c4-overview-vl
list=PLA32AD51107427A4B&feature=c4-overview-vl
list=PLA32AD51107427A4B&feature=c4-overview-vl

I set up all my guitars using his advice - and they are all jolly good now, even the cheapest one.  :tup:

Offline Mick

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 678
  • Site Owner
    • guitarist-guild
    • View Profile
    • Guitarist Guild
Re: Strat copy intonation problems
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2014, 08:35:05 AM »

Can I ask why you are adjusting the action height when you are trying to sort out the intonation?


H, the intonation was way out with the action set from factory, and with it as was I ran out of travel on the bridge saddle.  I then proceeded to lower the action, and then retuned and set intonation.  I got it as close as I can, it's better, but not spot on.  I'll have another go when I get some decent strings on this thing.  ;)
Thank You, "Guest" For Reading This Post.

Camera Craniums

Guitarist Guild

Offline Hinfrance

  • Global Moderator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 257
    • View Profile
Re: Strat copy intonation problems
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2014, 08:43:02 AM »
Sounds like you could have one like my mate's. I gave up on that one, because even when I managed to get an octave right some of the lower fretted notes were still miles out.

If you've done the truss rod and it's still not right you might have to move the whole bridge assembly. Or you could send the damned thing back to where it came from, or sell it to some unsuspecting non GG member!

In answer to your question about changing the strings - yes, you may very well have to tweak the guitar afterwards, but not generally by too much, because the frequency is primarily determined by the length of the string as it vibrates.

 

adorama.com